Colloidal Silver & Its Common Uses

The expression “colloidal silver” covers a wide selection of associated products that have been used as antifungal agents because at least the late 1800’s. Some were created by electrolysis and a few were created chemically. It remained in use as the key this merchandise until about 1938 when penicillin was created as a more affordable way of fighting germs from the body. Since its original development, colloidal silver was mainly silver particles suspended in water.

The definition of this term “colloid” has two different meanings that need to be recalled. The Chemistry definition of “colloid” is also, “a system in which finely divided particles are dispersed within a continuous medium (like water) in a way that prevents them from becoming readily filtered or immediately settled.”

Additionally, there is Physiology and Pathology definitions of “colloid” from that have an entirely unrelated and different significance into the Chemistry definition. The Physiology definition is, “the gelatinous product of the thyroid gland, which consists largely of thyroglobulin, which functions as the precursor and storage form of thyroid gland.” The Pathology expression is, “a gelatinous material caused by colloid degeneration in reproductive tissues.”

The term “colloid/colloidal” can be used to refer to both gelatinous and non-gelatinous centered goods. The Chemistry definition can be applied to both sorts of merchandise, but employing the Physiology and Pathology definitions may only be normally implemented to gelatinous/protein based goods and also that is a stretch if you don’t dismiss the simple fact that they’re especially clarifying product of the thyroid gland as well as diseased tissue.

The only known possible bad effect of “colloidal silver” was that using heavy and prolonged usage of gelatinous established silver goods, a decorative condition named Argyria can grow. According to the World Health Organization (WHO 1993) and the United States Environmental Protection Agency silver presents no poisonous effect and that intense overuse can cause this decorative condition. (USEPA 1992, 2001) It is thought that those gelatins/proteins significantly increase the possibility that silver might be deposited beneath the epidermal layer of skin. Imagine putting a small number of BBs or marbles at a bowl of water; then they can sink into the bottom of the bowl….But if you put the very same items in a bowl of Jell-o, then they won’t sink into the bottom as easily.